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There is no tomorrow.

There is only today.

If you want to learn piano, do it today.

If you want to write a novel, do it today.

If you want to leave a legacy, do it today.

Do it today.

There really is no tomorrow.

This reality is evident in Dr. Lee Lipsenthal’s book: Enjoy Every Sandwich, Living Each Day as If It Were Your Last.

It begins with Mark Twain’s lust for life epigraph:

The fear of death follows from the fear of life.

          A man who lives fully is prepared to die at any time.     

Since the mortality rate of life is one hundred percent, Lee asks us to embrace every moment of our mortality, to let our awareness of eventual death ground us.

His brief memoir is a story both grounded and fully alive to the life he lived.

To become mindful of that moment of death is not so much about no longer being afraid to die, for who is not at  least slightly fearful of that unknown. It is about living each day fully in its moment.

When would any of us consider it a good day to die? All of us would say, rather than really choose a day, we’d choose that there would be no day.418929_181417905324619_20151603_n

But, there will be a day.

Would this day be a good day?

Some face death sooner, some later.

The title of Lee’s book Enjoy Every Sandwich plays on the discovery of his terminal illness, found while actually eating a sandwich.

His cure for racing through life is a radical intervention that makes one choose to enjoy each and every sandwich, every day.

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Lee’s enthusiasm for living life in every moment inspires us to live life with gusto.

But being fully alive each and every day has nothing to do with the presence or absence of a life threatening disease.

It has everything to do with perspective and acceptance of our mortality.

As gaming fans know, “0 lives remaining” means exactly that.

The game is over.

We all have zero lives remaining.

Living life fully today is about living one’s life in crescendo, so that when the time does come, it will indeed be – a good day to die.

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